Nicholas County Skill Set Evaluation - July 2008



Martha G. Fightmaster, MA, NCC

859.268.2116

aquiredfacts@yahoo.com


 

 

Table of Contents

 

Introduction......................................................................................................................... 3

  

Population........................................................................................................................... 4

   Commuters.......................................................................................................................... 4

 

Existing Business and Industry Enterprises.............................................................. 5

Nicholas County.................................................................................................................. 5

Out-of-County...................................................................................................................... 5

Manufacturing...................................................................................................................... 5

Service................................................................................................................................. 6

Trade.................................................................................................................................... 6

 

Skill Sets by Occupation.................................................................................................. 7

   Goods Producing Occupations........................................................................................... 7

   Service Occupations........................................................................................................... 9

   Trade Occupations............................................................................................................ 10

   Public Administration Occupations.................................................................................... 11

 

Skill Sets by Academic Level........................................................................................ 13

Current workforce............................................................................................................. 13

Future Workforce.............................................................................................................. 14

 

Findings............................................................................................................................. 15

Potential Business and Industries...................................................................................... 15

              Manufacturing............................................................................................................... 15

       Service.......................................................................................................................... 16

       Self Employment.......................................................................................................... 16

        Challenges..................................................................................................................... 17

 

Appendix............................................................................................................................ 18

Table 1:    County-to-County 2000 Census Commuting Patterns................................ 18

Table 2:    General Population Data.............................................................................. 18

Table 3:    Annual Estimates of the Population for Counties of Kentucky:

                 April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2007......................................................................... 19

Table 4:    Annual Estimates of the Population for Incorporated Places in Kentucky, Listed April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006.................................................................................................. 19

Table 5:    Average Weekly Wage, 2006....................................................................... 19

Table 6:    Major Manufacturing Employers for Nicholas Co. Workforce.................... 20

Table 7:    Public School District Enrollments and Expenditures, 2006-07................... 22

Table 8:    College Readiness........................................................................................ 22

Table 9:    Highest Education Level............................................................................... 22

Table10:   Educational Pipeline..................................................................................... 23

 


 

 

Nicholas County Skill Set Evaluation

 

The following Nicholas County Skill Set Evaluation (NCSSE) has been prepared at the request of the Nicholas County Industrial Development Association (NCIDA). In 2007, NCIDA asked for a review of the county economic development operations and for recommendations of new practices. That review, conducted by the Kentucky Association for Economic Development, pointed out the need to know exactly what skills Nicholas County workers might have to offer prospective employers.

 

This Skill Set Evaluation (SSE) provides accurate, relevant and comprehensive information about Nicholas County's available workforce and the types of businesses and industries most likely to employ that workforce.

 

This evaluation is based on published data and information from interviews with residents, workers and employers. All interviews were off the record and will not be attributed. Interview materials are used to compare with published data and to provide real time information to the analysis.

Because of the particular location of Nicholas County in relation to other identifiable regions of the state, several data sources are referenced. Administratively and economically, Nicholas is included in the Bluegrass Area Development District (ADD) database. The Bluegrass ADD includes seventeen central Kentucky counties anchored by powerhouse employers Fayette and Scott.

 

Economically and demographically, Nicholas is connected with the Gateway and Buffalo Trace ADD databases, which border Nicholas to the east. Those ADDs make up the Ten County (TENCO) Workforce Investment Area.

Economically, Nicholas is most involved with seven other counties overlapping three ADDs: Bath, Bourbon, Fayette, Fleming, Harrison, Montgomery, and Scott. These counties and Nicholas make up the Seven Core Counties database, an artificial labor market area created for this study.

 

Locations that receive and contribute a small number of Nicholas County workers are not included for the purposes of this report. Those locations can be found in the commute table (See Appendix, Table 1).

 


 


According to the Kentucky Postsecondary Education 2008-10 County Profiles, the total population of Nicholas County in 2008 was 6,813. By 2007, a 1.1% increase was expected which is the lowest growth rate in the Core Counties. Bourbon and Harrison also show low-growth. Scott leads at nearly a 30% growth, followed by Montgomery at nearly 12%.

 

It has been estimated that the Carlisle city population grew 10% from 2000 to 2006. This increase was the second highest in the Core cities. Georgetown was estimated at a 12.6% increase, and Mt. Sterling at a 9.6% increase.

 

Of the whole Nicholas County population, 51% of the population is female, and 51% of the registered voters are female. Race is 98.5% white.

 

As of 2006, 4,559 (65.5%) residents were estimated to be workforce-eligible aged 15 to 64. The pipeline of worker prospects for the County is the newborn to 14-year old population which was estimated to be 1,368 in 2006. Public school-aged residents (5-19 year olds) for 2006 were estimated at 1,298.

 

Kentucky Workforce Kentucky Labor Market Information indicates that in 2007, 3,018 Nicholas adults were in the labor force, with 2,824 employed and 194 people registered as looking for work, an unemployment rate of 6.5%. The only county in the Core Counties with a higher unemployment rate was Bath County at 7.6%.

 

In 2008, the per capita income in Nicholas County was $15,880. Bath and Fleming Counties had a lower per capita income than Nicholas County. In 2000, 13.2% of Nicholas County residents’ income was below poverty level, ranking the County 5th lowest. Bath County had the highest percent at 21.9.

 

In all Core Counties, between 10 and 28% of residents were eligible for Medicaid. Nicholas had 21.9%. Nicholas had one of the lowest rates of residents without medical insurance at 12.5%. Bath had the most at 16.5%. Approximately 23% of the total population over 5 years of age have a disability.

 

 

Commuters

 

In all the Core Counties, the largest percentage of workers are residents of the county in which they are employed. For all Seven Core Counties, Fayette is the top destination for workers, with Scott second. No other county attracts more than 50 workers from more than two Core Counties.

 

Most Nicholas County workers who leave the county drive to Bourbon and Fayette. Harrison is a distant third destination for Nicholas workers, closely followed by Scott and Montgomery. Nicholas supplies the largest out-of-county workforces in Bourbon and Harrison counties, while receiving the largest out-of-county workforce from Bourbon, with Bath and Fleming each providing around 50 workers to the County.

 


 

 

An inventory of the employers of Nicholas workers defines both what skills the Nicholas employees have, and what employers might be targeted for new or expanding development in the county.

 

 

Nicholas County

 

More than 100 Business and Industry Enterprises employing over 1,300 workers have Carlisle/Nicholas County addresses. These Enterprises employ about one-third of the total workforce.

 

Retail Trade has the most addresses in the County, with grocery stores most numerous. Nicholas County has about twenty-five retail outlets selling gifts, prescriptions and medications, groceries, gas, furniture, farm supplies, tobacco and liquor, and general merchandise. Corporate retail trade employers include Shell, IGA, Dollar General, and Family Dollar. Although Retail has the most outlets, it employs fewer workers than the Services Industry.

 

Services Industries have the second greatest number of locations in Nicholas County. Beauty/barber shops are most numerous followed by insurance companies, barely outnumbering legal services and welding/machining/repair services. Other services listed in the County include over twenty places of employment such as banks, tourist attractions, automotive and motorcycle repair, day care, video rentals and the like. County food service workers are employed at four local eateries and two food/gas stations.

 

The Health Care Industry rounds out the top three sectors in the County with nine Carlisle/Nicholas County addresses including a hospital and a nursing home.

 

The Public Administration Industry has the most employees. School workers, City, County, and State government employees fill around 350 job slots in Nicholas County. The public school system is the largest single employer in Nicholas County.

 

Nicholas County has several private businesses which provide employment for few or many family members, as well as non-relatives. Additionally, some private enterprises are in the emerging phase of development and not yet on the economic radar of the county.

 

 

Out of County

 

More than 1,800 workers traveled out of the County for work in 2000. The trend has not changed eight years later.

 

 

Manufacturing

 

Toyota Motor Manufacturing of America (TMMA) is the dominant employer in this area, with a 2007 workforce of 6,750. Dozens of smaller TMMA suppliers in the Core County area employ upwards of 3,200 workers. These workers produce transportation equipment and components, or the machinery to produce transportation equipment and components.


 

Another 5,400 workers produce products such as cabinets, packaging, snack foods, fire fighting equipment, gas logs, and more. The majority of manufacturing workers from Nicholas County are male.

 

 

Service

 

Service Industries are recent players in economic development. Service industries now account for almost 70% of economic activity, according to MAPCS. The Service Industries that employ most Nicholas County residents are health care and food. These jobs are in the Core Counties and employ mostly female workers.

 

Health Care businesses employ the largest number of women from Nicholas County. Workers travel to Fayette, Bourbon, Fleming, Harrison, Montgomery counties and beyond. They work full or part-time in hospitals, medical offices and clinics, nursing/assisted living/retirement homes. The majority work as nurse aides with the remainder working as clerks, medical assistants, technicians and nurses.

 

National chain restaurants employ most of the Nicholas County Lodging/Food Service workers. Primarily female, this workforce also travels out to locations in Cynthiana, Paris, Georgetown or Mt. Sterling. They typically work as wait or kitchen staff.

 

 

Trade

 

National retail stores employ most of the Nicholas County retail workers. Mostly women, they travel to store locations in Cynthiana, Paris, Georgetown or Mt. Sterling. These jobs are quite often part-time.


 

Skill Sets by Occupation

 

The U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration Occupational Information Network (O*NET) program is the basis for identifying skill sets by occupation for this study. O*NET is the nation's primary source of occupational information on hundreds of standardized and occupation-specific descriptors. The database is continually updated by surveying a broad range of workers from each occupation and can be accessed at http://online.onetcenter.org/.

 

The top industries employing Nicholas County workers are Manufacturing, Services, Trade, and Public Administration. Health care is the largest Services employer.

 

Except for some Public Administration job titles, these industries often do not require a high school diploma or a GED in order to obtain entry level work. However, career ladder advancement in industries using Nicholas workers generally requires HS/GED. Once at that level, Manufacturing and Health Care routinely offers training to career employees, resulting in high-level technical skill sets.

 

Entry level work, no matter the industry, requires attendance, punctuality, capability and willingness to do the work.

 

 

Goods Producing Occupations

 

One of the largest industry employers of Nicholas workers is Manufacturing, employing roughly one-third of the workforce. These jobs are usually in production.

 

Most manufacturing employees work on a team that assembles an entire product or a component of a product. These workers can do all the team tasks in the assembly process and rotate assignments. They may be expected to contribute to making management decisions affecting the work. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, this occupation is rated In Demand.  Workers’ job titles include: Team Assembler, Assembler, Assembly Line Machine Operator, Assembly Operator, Assembly Line Worker, Assembly Associate, Certified Composites Technician (CCT), Operator Technician, Production Line Worker, Assembly Inspector, Assembly Technician.

 

To do this job, workers must be able to:

 

·       Learn and teach the job

·       Actively listen

·       Conduct quality control inspections

·       Understand new information

·       Monitor machine operations

·       Determine best tools and equipment for the job

·       Understand written job materials

·       Adjust actions in relation to others

·       Perform routine maintenance on equipment, troubleshoot, schedule

 

Computer Numerical Control Operator (CNC Operator) is a job title held by production workers. It may also be known as Computer Numerical Control Machinist (CNC Machinist), Machine Operator, Computer Numerical Control Lathe Operator (CNC Lathe Operator), Computer Numerical Control Machine Operator (CNC Machine Operator), Computer Numerical Control Mill Operator (CNC Mill Operator), Production Worker, Brake Press Operator, Computer Numerical Control Set-Up Technician (CNC Set-Up Technician), Computer Numerical Control Set-Up Operator (CNC Set-Up Operator). This occupation is rated In Demand.

These workers operate computer-controlled machines or robots to perform one or more machine functions on metal or plastic work pieces.

 

To do this job, workers must be able to:

 

·       Conduct quality control inspections

·       Control operation of equipment or systems

·       Repair equipment or systems

·       Perform routine maintenance on equipment

·       Monitor machine operations

·       Understand new information

·       Use logic and reasoning to problem solve

·       Adjust actions in relation to others

·       Teach the job

 

Nicholas workers hold jobs as Machinist, Machine Operator, Machinist Tool and Die, Maintenance Specialist, Set-Up Machinist, Utility Operator, Maintenance Machinist, Production Machinist, Maintenance Technician, Mold Tooling Designer (MTD).

 

These workers set up and operate a variety of machine tools to produce precision parts and instruments. The job area includes precision instrument makers who fabricate, modify, or repair mechanical instruments. They may also fabricate and modify parts to make or repair machine tools or maintain industrial machines, applying knowledge of mechanics, shop mathematics, metal properties, layout, and machining procedures.

 

To do this job, workers must be able to:

 

·       Control operation of equipment or systems

·       Monitor machine operations

·       Use math to solve problems

·       Determine best tools and equipment for the job

·       Troubleshoot

·       Understand written job materials

·       Conduct quality control inspections

·       Perform routine maintenance on equipment

·       Understand new information

·       Actively listen

 

Other jobs held by Nicholas production workers require the same skills as the three listed above. Other titles include, but are not limited to:

 

Welder, Welder-Fitter, Fabricator, Maintenance Welder, Mig Welder, Sub Arc Operator: In Demand

 

Tool and Die Maker, Toolmaker, Jig and Fixture Builder, Jig and Fixture Repairer, Tool and Die Machinist, Tool Repairer, Trim Die Maker, Die Maker

 

Multiple Machine Tool Setter, Operator and Tender Metal and Plastic Die Setter, Machine Operator, Machine Technician, Set-Up Person, CNC Operator (Computer Numerically Controlled Operator), CNC Machinist (Computer Numerically Controlled Machinist), Die Repairman, Cell Technician, CNC Machine Setter (Computer Numerically Controlled Machine Setter), Shear Operator

 

Helpers: Production Worker, Machine Operator, Press Helper, Service Person, Support Team Member, Utility Worker, Assistant Operator, Backup Operator, Clean-Up Person, Factory Laborer, Factory Worker

 

Extruding and Drawing Machine Setter, Operator and Tender Metal and Plastic, Extruder Operator, Machine Operator, Extrusion Press Operator, Operator, Wire Mill Operator, Set-Up Operator, Wire Mill Rover, Extrusion Mechanic, Insulation Operator, Jacket Line Operator

 

Food Cooking Machine Operator and Tender, Fryer Operator, Processor, Kettle Fry Cook Operator, Retort Operator, Mogul Operator, Master Cook, Process Technician, Cooker Mechanic, Sanding Line Operator, Thermo Processor.

 

 

Service Occupations

 

Roughly one-third of the Nicholas Service workers are employed in the Health Care Industry.

Local employment opportunities in this industry are numerous. The Core County area is also full of medical and medical support service sites, and supports a substantial workforce throughout central Kentucky.

 

Many Nicholas County health care workers are employed as Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants. They might be called Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA), Certified Nurse Aide (CNA), Nursing Assistant, Psychiatric Attendant, Nurse's Aide, Nursing Aid, Patient Care Technician, Resident Assistant, Caregiver, Patient Care Assistant (PCA). These titles are classified as In Demand.

 

These workers provide routine, personal health care, such as moving patients, changing linens, bathing, dressing, or grooming services are provided to the elderly, convalescents, or disabled persons in their homes or in residential care facilities.

 

To do these jobs, workers must be able to:

 

·       Actively listen

·       Teach the job

·       Talk to people to convey information

·       Adjust actions in relation to others

·       Manage time

·       Actively seek ways to help people

·       Monitor performance of self and take corrective action

·       Be aware of others’ reactions and understand why

·       Use logic and reasoning to problem solve

·       Understand written job materials

 

Medical assisting employs many Nicholas County health care workers. They might be employed as Medical Assistant, Certified Medical Assistant (CMA), Medical Office Assistant, Optometric Assistant, Clinical Assistant, Registered Medical Assistant, Certified Ophthalmic Technician, Chiropractor Assistant, Ophthalmic Assistant. These titles generally require a HS/GED and have an apprenticeship specialty. They are considered In Demand.


 

Medical assistants perform administrative and certain clinical duties under the direction of a physician. Administrative duties may include scheduling appointments, maintaining medical records, billing, and coding for insurance purposes. Clinical duties may include taking and recording vital signs and medical histories, preparing patients for examination, drawing blood, and administering medications as directed by a physician, providing orientation and direction in the proper use of patient-operated medical equipment and testing devices.

 

To do this job, these workers must be able to:

 

·       Actively listen

·       Be aware of others’ reactions and understand why

·       Talk to people to convey information

·       Teach the job

·       Understand written job materials

·       Understand new information

·       Actively seek ways to help people

·       Manage time

·       Learn and teach new things

·       Communicate effectively in writing

·        

A smaller number of health care workers are medical secretaries. Titles for these positions are Receptionist, Office Manager, Front Office Manager, Health Unit Coordinator, Patient Coordinator, Patient Services Representative. These titles are In Demand.

 

Medical secretaries perform secretarial duties utilizing specific knowledge of medical terminology and hospital, clinic, or laboratory procedures. Duties include scheduling appointments, billing patients, and compiling and recording medical charts, reports, and correspondence.

 

To do this job, these workers must be able to:

 

·       Actively listen

·       Understand written job materials

·       Talk to people to convey information

·       Adjust actions in relation to others

·       Understand new information

·       Manage time

·       Teach the job

·       Communicate effectively in writing

·       Actively seek ways to help people

·       Learn and teach new things

 

 

Trade Occupations

 

Trade is an industry employing several hundreds of Nicholas workers.

 

The most common job titles in Trade are Retail Salesperson, Sales Clerk, Sales Associate, Clerk, Sales Consultant, Sales Person, Merchandise Manager, Retail Salesperson, Selling Manager, Store Manager. These titles are In Demand.

 

Retail workers sell merchandise, such as furniture, motor vehicles, appliances, or apparel in a retail establishment. They use equipment such as barcode scanners, cash registers, desktop computers, magnetic card readers, point of sale terminals.

 

They use the following skills to do the job:

 

·       Actively listen

·       Use math to solve problems

·       Talk to people to convey information

·       Be aware of others’ reactions and understand why

·       Use logic and reasoning to problem solve

·       Communicate effectively in writing

·       Use judgment in decision making

·       Teach the job

·       Understand written job materials

 

 

Public Administration Occupations

 

This sector has a substantial number of employees. In Nicholas, a large number of public administration employees are teachers.

 

Teachers may be classified as English Teacher, Math Teacher (Mathematics Teacher), Social

Studies Teacher, Science Teacher, Spanish Teacher, Secondary Teacher, Art Teacher, Classroom Teacher, Biology Teacher or the like. In elementary school, teachers may work as Teacher, Elementary Teacher, Classroom Teacher, Art Teacher, Educator, Elementary Education Teacher, Primary Teacher, Title One Reading Teacher, Reading Recovery Teacher.

 

At the elementary level, teachers instruct students in basic academic, social, and other formative skills. At the secondary level, teachers instruct students in one or more academic subjects such as English, mathematics, or social studies. Teaching assignments may be designated according to subject matter specialty, such as typing instructors, commercial teachers, or English teachers.

 

Teachers must have the following skills in order to do the job:

 

·       Teach others how to do something

·       Learn and teach new things

·       Monitor performance of self and take corrective action

·       Talk to people to convey information

·       Manage time

·       Understand new information

·       Actively listen

·       Be aware of others’ reactions and understand why

·       Use logic and reasoning to problem solve

·       Understand written job materials

 

General office clerk is a large job category. These workers perform duties too varied and diverse to be classified in any specific office clerical occupation, requiring limited knowledge of office management systems and procedures. Clerical duties may be assigned in accordance with the office procedures of individual establishments and may include a combination of answering telephones, bookkeeping, typing or word processing, stenography, office machine operation, and filing. These job titles are In Demand.


 

Workers may be listed as Administrative Assistant, Office Manager, Receptionist, Clerk, Secretary, Office Assistant, Office Clerk, Customer Service Representative, Office Coordinator, Court Clerk.

 

These workers need the following skills to do their job:

 

·       Actively listen

·       Understand written job materials

·       Talk to people to convey information

·       Communicate effectively in writing

·       Be aware of others’ reactions and understand why.

 


 

Skill Sets by Academic Level

 

The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 and the National Literacy Act of 1991 define literacy as "an individual's ability to read, write, speak in English, compute and solve problems at levels of proficiency necessary to function on the job, in the family of the individual and in society."

 

 

Current Workforce

 

Graduation from high school or an equivalency program is the literacy level accepted by employers, career ladders, certifying professional, trade and technical organizations, and higher education. In Kentucky, about 26% of the adults lack this literacy level. In Nicholas County, slightly more than 37% of the adults fall below this level. Only Bath County has a higher percentage of people in this category. Fayette, Scott and Bourbon have the least percent of people without a diploma.

 

This portion of the workforce is very likely to have difficulty reading or understanding materials such as newspapers or drug and food labels. They may not be able to complete a job application. They may not be able to fill out an order form or balance a checkbook (Source: State Assessment of Adult Literacy Survey, 2003).

 

At this level of literacy, according to United States Department of Labor, workers may be able to apply common sense understanding to complete simple one- or two-step instructions and deal with very routine situations. They may be able to make change or follow a recipe. They may print, speak and read simple sentences.

 

The percent of Nicholas adults who are high school graduates is 37.6%, an amount almost equal to the percent of non-graduates. Harrison, Montgomery and Bourbon have the highest percentage of high school graduates, while Fayette, Scott and Bath have the least. This level of academic achievement and literacy mastery is generally the minimum acceptable level for entry into career ladder occupations.

 

At the high school graduate level, the workforce typically can apply common sense understanding to carry out detailed instructions and deal with concrete problems in standard situations. They can perform the four basic mathematical operations with whole numbers, common fractions and decimals. They can draw and understand bar graphs. They can read operating manuals, write compound and complex sentences, and speak clearly and distinctly.

 

Workers with some college are more likely to be able to follow written, oral or diagrammatic instructions, calculate prices, ratios, proportions, percentages, square roots, plane and solid figures; they should be able to read safety rules and shop manuals; they should be able to write reports and talk in front of an audience with poise, confidence, and correct English. Employers can be very interested in candidates with some college but no degree.

 

The percent of Nicholas adults with some college is 13.4%. Fayette, Scott and Bourbon have the most; Bath, Nicholas and Montgomery have the least.

 

An associate’s degree has become the portal for workers to hop on the fast track to advanced education, training, and promotions. About 4.4% of the adults in Nicholas have associate degrees. This ranks the county exactly in the middle of the Core County rate: Fayette and Scott are at the top with over 6%, while Bath is the lowest with less than 3%.


 

Associate degree level of competencies includes the ability to apply principles of rational systems to solve practical problems, and to deal with a variety of concrete variables in nonstandard situations. This level of worker is able to deal with real number systems, algebraic solutions, limits, continuity, statistical inference, plane and solid geometry, practical applications of math, measurements, and construction.

 

A bachelor’s degree is typically considered as the necessary level of education in order to achieve a good job, spouse, address and bank account. While those outcomes may not necessarily follow, the competencies of people at this level should be substantial.

 

With this level of education, the workforce should be able to apply logic or scientific thinking to solve problems with abstract and concrete variables, interpret an extensive variety of technical instructions; work with algebra, calculus and statistics; read scientific and technical journals, abstracts, financial reports, and legal documents; write speeches and manuals; speak knowledgably, effectively and persuasively.

 

In the Nicholas population, 7.5% of the residents have a bachelor’s degree or higher, the least of all counties in the Core. Not surprisingly, Fayette, Scott and Bourbon have the most college graduates, while Bath and Fleming join Nicholas with the least.

 

 

Future Workforce

 

Nicholas is a rural school system with the least enrollment of any of the Core Counties. Only the one city school system is smaller than the county system. Nicholas spends less money per pupil than any of the Core Counties. Bourbon County spends most of the rural county systems; Fayette, a State and Metropolitan Area (SMA), spends the most. Nicholas has the second highest pupil-teacher ratio at 16:5. The lowest ratio among rural county systems is 15:4 at Bourbon. Fayette's ratio is 13:7.

 

Nicholas County ranks last in the Core Counties region for high school student ACT scores. It has the highest percent of students under-prepared for college in one or more subjects (62.1%). Of the students entering college from Nicholas County, nearly 40% need developmental instruction in math and over 50% need developmental instruction in English.

 

Nevertheless, Nicholas holds top spot in sending their youth to college. The 2006 rate of in-state college enrollment for students from Nicholas was 63.9%, nearly a full 4 percentage points better than Fayette. Of the Core Counties, only Montgomery and Bath send fewer than half their high school graduates to college in-state.

 

Nicholas also holds top spot in graduating those youth. The bachelor degree six-year graduation rate for 2006 was a stellar 69.2%. Only small Robertson County, not in the Core group but still an available workforce, beat that, with 100% of their students finishing in six years. Except for Fayette, where 52.3% of the students graduated in six years, all the Core County rates were in the 40s, with Bourbon, a well-financed district, graduating only 31.4% of its students with baccalaureate degrees in six years.

 


 

 

The Nicholas County workforce is a small but important component of the labor that feeds into the economic powerhouse of the Bluegrass Area Development District (ADD). Nicholas supplies the largest percent of out-of-county workers to Bourbon and Harrison Counties.

 

Most Nicholas workers are typically stable, practical, hands-on with tools and machines, action-oriented doers. They are reliable employees with common sense, concrete problem solving ability, physical skills and mechanical experience. They prefer to be shown the work rather than to be told and are not eager to write out instructions or other verbal communications. They respond to clear and measurable goals and deadlines and prefer to do the work themselves. They would rather work with things than with people.

 

The majority tend to be sensible and conservative. They work better when work flows by plan, with the hours, rules and procedures well-defined. Change is not welcome and they prefer to minimize risks and permit the status quo. They prefer to follow a clear line of authority and work well with a good leader. Many workers have number skills, are good at tracking data and can organize approaches to projects or problems.

 

A smaller number of Nicholas workers have the knack for being sociable, energetic, persuasive, and outgoing. These workers typically enjoy challenges and can start up and carry out projects. Their skills involve leading people and making many decisions that require risk taking. These workers are or will be supervisors, managers, business owners, sales representatives, or elected officials.

 

Too many Nicholas workers do not have the benefit of literacy to back up their work skills. Current worker literacy levels are low; more than one-third of the adults lack secondary certificates. While these workers might be excellent at their jobs, their progress on a career ladder is very slow to null.

 

Preparation of the new workforce is not encouraging. Secondary students perform at the bottom of many academic indicators. Without some change, the basic competencies for occupational success of Nicholas’s future workforce will not improve.

 

 

Potential Business and Industries

 

Manufacturing

 

Manufacturing is an appropriate employer target. Although declining over the long term, manufacturing remains an enormous industry. It will require machine parts, tools, maintenance, repair, design and build for as long as machines run. The Nicholas workforce has competent experience providing these skills. The workforce is strong in machinery manufacturing and fabricated metal product manufacturing built to international standards.

 

All business and industry enterprises require tools and the tools to make tools in order to produce products or services. Nicholas workers might be able to satisfy that need. They would be very attractive to small batch manufacturers of equipment or parts used in hand tools, cars, sticky notes, storage cabinets, snack foods, paper boxes, picture frames, stud guns, gas logs, electrical boxes, and safety hard hats, to name only a few of the possible options.

 

Most of the skills this group possesses are In Demand, according to the United States Government. Many of the jobs that employ these skills are eligible for apprenticeship training through labor unions. Employers and employees both benefit from these opportunities.

 

Specialty or niche machining employers are a reasonable target. Nicholas workers have the skills to become suppliers of small-batch high-grade machine tools or component parts used in the international production of goods.

 

Most of the skills this group possesses are In Demand, according to the United States Government. Many of the jobs that employ these skills are eligible for apprenticeship training through labor unions. Employers and employees both benefit from these opportunities.

 

Over forty-one apprentice-eligible job titles are associated with machining, operating, tool and die making.

 

 

Service

 

Health Care Services is an appropriate employer target. Most Nicholas Service workers are in health care jobs. Health is one of the most hi-tech, dynamic, and rapidly growing areas of the service economy, along with information, communication, computer services, and business services. Many health care jobs are In Demand, and given the aging population, no slowing of demand seems likely.

 

The store of knowledge held by these workers is most likely quite substantial. They have experience and are required to complete continuing education through in-service and/or post-secondary training.

 

This workforce would be attractive to new or expanding medical services enterprises. They have the skills to provide patient care and treatment. Some of the workforce might be excellent candidates to staff a medical help call center located in the county or to work as traveling health care providers.

 

Some Nicholas health care workers might be attractive to vocational training providers. One apprentice-eligible job title is associated with health care services.

 

Business Services is an appropriate employer target. This category is in the top three for growth in the U.S. and in the state. Some Nicholas workers are experienced and successful in providing administrative support to complex organizations. Employer targets would be those who require a workforce that is accurate, timely, and organized with data and systems. Data processing entities like insurance claims businesses could be appropriate targets.

 

Self-employment

 

Self-employment is an appropriate employer target. According to the Cabinet for Economic Development, 70% of job creation comes from expanding existing industry. The best candidates to bring jobs and economic growth to Nicholas County might already be present. Already home to a few niche industries, Nicholas could build on those efforts.

 

Tourism might be a target industry for Nicholas County workers. They have the skills to deal with tourists and handle the data, and Nicholas County has tourist attractions people would come to visit.

 

Kentucky is one of thirty-three cattle exporting states, and one of thirteen broiler chicken exporting states. Nicholas County workers raise cattle and could perhaps raise broilers.

 

 

Challenges

 

Nicholas workers are bordered to the west by more and better educated workers. While the Nicholas workforce is clearly competent in its endeavors, progress depends on improving skills, knowledge and abilities. To make that shift to progress, the Nicholas community will have to take decisive action to upgrade the current workforce and adequately prepare the future one.

 

In the study "Economic Growth in Kentucky: Why Does Kentucky Lag Behind the Rest of the South*," the authors identify four influences on economic growth in Kentucky:

 

·       The most powerful factor limiting income is store of knowledge

·       Rural life, poor roads, and few new people moving in keeps incomes low

·       Lack of skilled workers and innovative work results in slow growth

·       Lack of coordination between local, regional and state economic and workforce development, postsecondary, parks and tourism can hamper effective economic development efforts.

 

Nicholas County does not have to lag behind, but going forward will require much work.

 

*Written by Christopher Jepsen, Kenneth Sanford and Kenneth R. Troske submitted to Partnership Board for the Cabinet for Economic Development, January, 2008.


Appendix

 

 

 

Table 1

 

County-to-County 2000 Census Commuting Patterns

Lives in Nicholas

and works in:

Number of

Workers

 

 

 

Lives in:

 

Works in

Nicholas

Total

2,816

 

Total

1,355

Bourbon KY

625

 

Bath KY

53

Clark KY

32

 

Bourbon KY

111

Fayette KY

507

 

Fleming KY

49

Fleming KY

38

 

Mason KY

22

Franklin KY

34

 

Montgomery KY

24

Harrison KY

177

 

Nicholas KY

1,049

Montgomery KY

132

 

Robertson KY

22

Nicholas KY

1,049

 

Rowan KY

25

Robertson KY

27

 

 

 

Scott KY

174

 

 

 

Woodford KY

21

 

 

 

Source:  2000 U.S. Census Data

 

 

 

 

Table 2

 

General Population Data

 

Total Population

Median household income

Per capita income

Living in poverty

Eligible for Medicaid

Without medical insurance

Registered voters who voted in 2004 general election

Unemployment rate

Use the Internet at home

Kentucky

4,041,769

$33,672

$18,093

15.8%

17.6%

13.3%

64.7%

5.7%

64.0%

Bath

11,085

$26,018

$15,326

21.9%

28.0%

16.5%

57.8%

7.7%

52.6%

Bourbon

19,360

$35,038

$18,335

14.0%

14.6%

13.5%

63.8%

4.9%

64.6%

Fayette

260,512

$39,813

$23,109

12.9%

10.5%

13.1%

75.9%

4.3%

78.2%

Fleming

13,792

$27,990

$14,214

18.6%

20.3%

15.8%

61.0%

6.5%

54.7%

Harrison

17,983

$36,210

$17,478

12.0%

15.6%

12.2%

64.4%

5.5%

70.7%

Montgomery

22,554

$31,746

$16,701

15.2%

21.2%

13.7%

61.6%

6.0%

58.7%

Nicholas

6,813

$29,886

$15,880

13.2%

21.9%

12.5%

57.5%

6.9%

55.3%

Scott

33,061

$47,081

$21,490

8.8%

13.9%

12.6%

69.4%

4.8%

71.3%

Source:  Kentucky Postsecondary Education 2008-10 County Profiles

 


 

Table 3

 

Annual Estimates of the Population for Counties of Kentucky: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2007

Geographic Area 

Number 

 Percent

Kentucky

                  199,705

4.9

Bath

                         507

4.6

Bourbon

                         396

2.0

Fayette

                    18,532

7.1

Fleming

                         903

6.5

Harrison

                         569

3.2

Montgomery

                      2,674

11.9

Nicholas

                           76

1.1

Scott

                      9,893

29.9

Source:  Population Division, U. S Census Bureau, 2007 County Total Population Estimates Released 04/2/08

 

 

Table 4

 

Annual Estimates of the Population for Incorporated Places in Kentucky, Listed April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006

 Note: Change is calculated from Census 2000 to July 1, 2006 estimate.

Geographic Area

2000-2006

# change

2000-2006

% change

Bath--Owingsville city 

97

6.1%

Bourbon--Paris city

121

1.3%

Fayette--Lexington-Fayette

10,277

3.8%

Fleming--Flemingsburg city

82

2.7%

Harrison--Cynthiana city

42

0.7%

Montgomery--Mount Sterling city

623

9.6%

Nicholas--Carlisle city

212

10.0%

Scott--Georgetown city

2,605

12.6%

Source: Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau; Date: June 28, 2007                          

 

 

Table 5

 

Average Weekly Wage, 2006

 

KY

Bath

Bourbon

Fayette

Fleming

Harrison

Montgomery

Nicholas

Scott

All Industries

$677

$503

$627

$735

$507

$619

$530

$462

$889

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting

549

0

0

620

0

0

0

373

0

Mining

1,071

N/A

0

954

0

N/A

0

N/A

0

Construction

717

0

551

797

508

0

695

407

787

Manufacturing

874

538

863

1,120

592

922

635

446

1,404

Trade, Transportation and Utilities

633

384

432

599

450

405

415

354

656

Information

753

0

748

896

674

523

491

0

622

Financial Activities

880

595

735

868

513

553

587

0

612

Services

585

384

417

648

285

460

381

457

435

Public Administration

743

473

537

883

496

579

581

404

593

Oher

818

0

451

772

0

69

385

0

786

Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of the Labor Statistics.

 


Table 6

 

Major Manufacturing Employers for Nicholas Co. Workforce

County

Company

Name

Address and

Telephone Number

Employment (2007)

Bath

Accutronix Manufacturing Services

60 Donotech Dr. Owingsville, KY 40360

606-674-6319

38

 

Cintas Manufacturing LLC

Route 3 Kendall Springs Rd

Owingsville, KY 40360

606-674-6000

1989

 

Custom Food Products Inc

59 Custom Food Dr, Owingsville, KY 40360

141

 

Southern States Cooperative Inc

409 Brooks Ave, Owingsville, KY 40360

14

Bourbon

CMC/CLA--Div Central Motor Wheel LLC

125 Wheat Dr, Paris, KY  40361-2502

859-987-0500

475

 

Easy Gardener Products Inc

1750 17th St, Paris, KY  40361-1160

859-987-5389

41

 

ITW Ramset--Div Illinois Tool Works Inc

7000 Bypass Rd, Paris, KY  40361-2146

859-987-7900

55

 

Kentucky Textiles Inc

1800 S Main St, Paris, KY  40361

859-987-5228

25

 

Mallinckrodt-Baker Inc

7001 Bypass Rd, Paris, KY  40361-2147

859-987-7000

250

 

Monessen Hearth Systems

149 Cleveland Dr, Paris, KY  40361-9782

859-987-0740

412

 

Paris Machining Division--Lake City Industries LLC

1020 Wes Lee Dr, Paris, KY  40361-2201

859-987-6320

84

 

Prime Finish LLC

129 Cleveland Dr., Paris, KY  40361-9782

859-988-9000

67

 

Southeastern KY Rehabilitation Industries Inc

1 W 20th St, Paris, KY  40361

859-987-5261

92

 

T & WA of Paris LLC

160 Cleveland Dr, Paris, KY  40361

859-988-0003

91

 

Western Pacific Storage Systems

2008 Cypress St Ste 150, Paris, KY  40361

859-987-2724

40

 

Joy Mining Machinery-Stamler Products

100 Stamler St, Millersburg, KY  40348

859-484-3431

252

Fayette

Amazon Com Kydc, Inc

 

1850 Mercer Rd, Lexington, KY  40511-1013

Phone: (859) 381-2102

1,782

 

Lexmark International Inc

 

740 W New Circle Rd, Lexington, KY  40550

Telephone: 859-232-2000

3,130

 

Square D Company

 

1601 Mercer Rd, Lexington, KY  40511-1070

Telephone: 859-243-8000

617

 

Trane Co

1515 Mercer Rd, Lexington, KY 40511-1080

Telephone: 859-259-2500

1,300

Fleming

Toyo Seat USA Corp

112 Toyo Drive, Flemingsburg, KY  41041

859-849-3009

262

Harrison

Bullard

1562 New Lair Rd, Cynthiana, KY  41031

859-234-6611

280

 

E-Z Pack

200 Ladish Rd, Cynthiana, KY  41031-0709

859-234-1100

153

 

3M

1308 New Lair Rd, Cynthiana, KY  41031

859-234-5671

530

 

TI Group Automotive Systems

1070 KY HWY 356, Cynthiana, KY  41031

859-234-2341

140

Montgomery

A O Smith Electrical Products Co--Sub A O Smith Corp

2001 Owingsville Rd, Mt. Sterling, KY  40353

859-498-1020

150

 

Carson Industries LLC

280 Midland Trl, Mt. Sterling, KY  40353

859-498-7615

44

Montgomery-continued

Cooper Standard Automotive

250 Oak Grove Dr, Mt. Sterling, KY  40353

859-497-9600

575

 

Gateway Manufacturing Inc

2671 Owingsville Rd,

Mt. Sterling, KY  40353-9052; 859-497-0058

51

 

Hoffman Enclosures Inc--Sub Pentair Inc

200 Oak Grove Dr, Mt. Sterling, KY  40353

859-497-3100

316

 

Kyosan DENSO Manufacturing Kentucky LLC (KDMK)

65 Clarence Dr, Mt. Sterling, KY  40353

859-497-2040

485

 

Nestle Prepared Foods--HHFG

150 Oak Grove Dr, Mt. Sterling, KY  40353

859-498-4300

1102

 

Precision Resource Inc

171 Oak Grove Dr, Mt. Sterling, KY  40353

859-498-5887

75

 

Quality Cabinets

52 Clarence Dr, Mt. Sterling, KY  40353

859-498-9801

500

 

Rogers Foam Corporation

120 Clarence Dr, Mt. Sterling, KY  40353

859-497-0702

92

 

Summit Polymers Inc

160 Clarence Dr, Mt. Sterling, KY  40353

859-498-5456

270

 

Moulding & Millwork Inc Manufacturing

7755 Main St, Jeffersonville, KY  40337

859-497-0017

90

Nicholas

Lee-Lynn Machining Inc

2200 Concrete Rd, Carlisle, KY  40311-9721

859-289-4402

27

Scott

AT & O Tech Inc

221 Corporate Blvd, Georgetown, KY  40324

502-570-2300

22

 

Carbide Products Inc

800 Clayton Ave, Georgetown, KY  40324

502-863-2340

35

 

Concept Packaging Group

1 Quality Dr, Georgetown, KY  40324-8809

502-570-2440

119

 

International Crankshaft Inc

101 Carley Ct, Georgetown, KY  40324-9303

502-868-0003

170

 

Industrial Tech Services Inc

321 Triport Rd, Georgetown, KY  40324

502-863-4941

51

 

Johnson Controls Inc

947 E Main St, Georgetown, KY  40324

502-570-5000

251

 

Johnson Controls Inc--FoaMech Pit

824 Lemons Mill Rd, Georgetown, KY 40324

502-863-0400

388

 

Louisville Forge & Gear Works LLC

596 Triport Rd, Georgetown, KY  40324

502-863-7575

320

 

Minova USA

150 Carley Ct, Georgetown, KY  40324-9303

502-863-6800

140

 

ORBIS Material Handling Inc

120 Commerce Ln, Georgetown, KY  40324

502-863-5500

120

 

Qualex Manufacturing LLC

261 Triport Rd, Georgetown, KY  40324

502-863-6348

183

 

Toyota Motor Manufacturing Kentucky

1001 Cherry Blossom Way

Georgetown, KY  40324-9564; 502-868-2000

6750

 

Toyota Tsusho America Inc

700 Triport Rd, Georgetown, KY  40324

502-868-3459

356

 

Vuteq USA Inc--Sub Chubu Industries

100 Carley Ct, Georgetown, KY  40324-9363

502-863-6322

120

Source:  2008 Kentucky Directory of Manufacturers, Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development, Division of Research and Site Evaluation


 

 

Table 7

Public School District Enrollments and Expenditures, 2006-07

School District

Total Enrollment

Expenditures Per Pupil

Pupil to Teacher Ratio

Kentucky

668,337

$9,602

16.1

Bath County Schools

2,026

$8,047

15.8

Bourbon County Schools

2,724

$8,768

15.4

Bourbon County--Paris Independent Schools

757

$8,888

13.9

Fayette County Schools

35,559

$9,340

13.7

Fleming County Schools

2,430

$9,141

15.1

Harrison County Schools

3,255

$7,567

17

Montgomery County Schools

4,528

$8,132

16.1

Nicholas County Schools

1,201

$7,558

16.5

Scott County Schools

7,450

$8,384

16.3

Source: Kentucky Department of Education, Office of Curriculum, Assessment and Accountability

 

Table 8

 

 

 

College Readiness

 

Average ACT

% entering college with developmental needs in mathematics

% entering college with developmental needs in English

Kentucky

20.6%

35.4%

28.6%

Bath

19.5%

54.8%

33.3%

Bourbon

20.0%

39.1%

42.0%

Fayette

22.7%

31.5%

27.6%

Fleming

20.1%

35.9%

37.5%

Harrison

20.1%

36.5%

31.1%

Montgomery

20.3%

41.6%

35.4%

Nicholas

18.4%

37.9%

51.7%

Scott

21.6%

33.8%

26.3%

Source:  Kentucky Postsecondary Education 2008-10 County Profiles

Table 9

 

Highest Education Level

 

Less than a high school diploma or equivalent

High school diploma or equivalent

Some college but no degree

Associate's degree

Bachelor's degree or higher

Kentucky

25.9%

33.6%

18.5%

4.9%

17.1%

Bath

41.0%

34.5%

11.8%

2.7%

10.1%

Bourbon

24.6%

38.7%

19.1%

4.1%

13.5%

Fayette

14.2%

22.4%

21.4%

6.4%

35.6%

Fleming

33.5%

37.9%

17.8%

4.9%

8.8%

Harrison

25.8%

42.6%

17.0%

3.9%

10.6%

Montgomery

29.5%

39.3%

14.6%

3.3%

13.4%

Nicholas

37.1%

37.6%

13.4%

4.4%

7.5%

Scott

19.5%

33.3%

20.8%

6.1%

20.3%

Source:  Kentucky Postsecondary Education 2008-10 County Profiles


 

 

Table 10

 

Educational Pipeline

County

High School

graduates

in 2006

In-state college-going rate for 2006

high school graduates

Bachelor's degree

six-year graduation rate for 2006

Bath

114

49.6%

47.6%

Bourbon

206

52.6%

31.4%

Fayette

2,221

59.1%

52.3%

Fleming

154

58.3%

44.2%

Harrison

187

63.5%

45.7%

Montgomery

194

48.8%

40.6%

Nicholas

64

63.6%

69.2%

Scott

350

52.0%

47.5%

Source:  Kentucky Postsecondary Education 2008-10 County Profiles